AfghanistanChina’s Response to the Taliban’s Takeover

Published 24 August 2021

“The primary interest for China in Afghanistan is ensuring stability so that no unrest would spill over into the wider region and China in particular. In this sense, the U.S. presence in Afghanistan has been a positive for China as it has played the security role at no cost to China. Now, China will have to develop its own relationships with the Taliban,” says Harvard’s China expert Tony Saich.

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation sat down with Ash Center Director Anthony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs, to discuss China’s reaction to the Taliban’s takeover of Kabul and how recent events may impact the U.S. role in the Asia-Pacific region. Tony Saich’s latest book is From Rebel to Ruler: One Hundred Years of the Chinese Communist Party.

ASH: What is the view in Beijing of the abrupt collapse of Afghanistan’s government following the withdrawal of U.S. troops?
Anthony Saich
: Chinese state media has been using the U.S. withdrawal to score propaganda points. It has highlighted the chaotic scenes that followed the initial withdrawal and this fits with the general narrative that the U.S. is in decline and is no longer a major global force.

Second, they have used this to stress that the U.S. is not a reliable ally and thus cannot be counted on. This has included indicating to Taiwan that there is no guarantee that the U.S. would provide support to the island in the future. Taiwan is on its own in the face of Beijing’s pressure.

However, these public statements mark concerns and some commentators have suggested a more nuanced view. The primary interest for China in Afghanistan is ensuring stability so that no unrest would spill over into the wider region and China in particular. In this sense, the U.S. presence in Afghanistan has been a positive for China as it has played the security role at no cost to China. Now, China will have to develop its own relationships with the Taliban. Thus, China’s Foreign Minister met with a Taliban delegation headed by Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar (July 28) in Tianjin to discuss relations.

ASH: How does the Taliban’s capture of Kabul impact China’s interests in the region?
Saich
: Meeting in Tianjin, Wang Yi stressed China’s desire to have a stable neighbor and to guarantee that Beijing would play an active role in helping the country rebuild. Wang stressed the principle of non-interference to contrast with the actions of the USA and NATO. For his part, Baradar welcomed China’s economic engagement. This could be beneficial for China, given the richness of rare earth and other resources that Afghanistan possesses.

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